Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 2) – Compensation for hours of long-term shift work

Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 2) entitled "Compensation for hours of long-term shift work",  approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1 September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208538.

 

This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 22B (Rev. 1) also entitled "Compensation for hours of long-term shift work" of March 2011.

This document contains minor changes to reflect the new career structure.

This circular will enter into force on 1 September 2016.

Administrative Cicular No. 31 (Rev. 2) – International indemnity and non-resident allowance

Administrative Circular No. 31 (Rev. 2) entitled "International indemnity and non-resident allowance", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 23 June 2016, will be available on 1 September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208547.

 

This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 31 (Rev. 1) also entitled "International indemnity and non-resident allowance" of October 2007.

The main changes reflect the decision taken in the framework of the five-yearly review to extend eligibility for international indemnity to all staff members, as well to introduce a distinction between current staff members and those recruited as from 1 September 2016. For the latter, the international indemnity will be calculated as a percentage of the minimum salary of the grade into which they are recruited; the amount granted to the former will not change, and is now expressed as a percentage of the midpoint salary of the grade corresponding to their career path at the time of recruitment.

This circular will enter into force on 1 September 2016.

Staff Rules and Regulations – Modification No. 11 to the 11th edition

The following modifications to the Staff Rules and Regulations have been implemented:

 

  • In the framework of the Five-Yearly Review 2015, in accordance with the decisions taken by the Council in December 2015 (CERN/3213), relating to the new CERN career structure;
     
  • In accordance with the decisions taken by the Council in June 2016 (CERN/3247), relating to the status of apprentices and the remaining technical adjustments.

 

The modifications relating to the status of apprentices have entered into force on 1 August 2016 and those relating to the new CERN career structure and the technical adjustments will enter into force on 1 September 2016.

  • Preliminary Note, Contents - amendment of page iv.
     
  • Chapter I, General Provisions
    • Section 2 (Categories of members of the personnel) - amendment of pages 2 and 3.
       
  • Chapter II, Conditions of Employment and Association
  • Section 1 (Employment and association) - amendment of pages 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15.
  • Section 2 (Classification and merit recognition) – amendment of pages 16, 17 and 18.
  • Section 3 (Learning and development) - amendment of pages 19 and 20.
  • Section 4 (Leave) - amendment of pages 21, 22, 23, 25 and 26.
  • Section 5 (Termination of contract) - amendment of page 29.
     
  • Chapter III, Working Conditions
    • Section 1 (Working hours) – amendment of pages 30, 31 and 32.
       
  • Chapter IV, Social Conditions
  • Section 1 (Family and family benefits) - amendment of pages 37 and 38.
  • Section 2 (Social insurance cover) - amendment of pages 39 and 40.
     
  • Chapter V, Financial conditions
    • Section 1 (Financial benefits) – amendment of pages 41, 42, 43, 45, 46 and 47.
       
  • Chapter VI, Settlement of Disputes and Discipline
    • Section 1 (Settlement of disputes) - amendment of page 50.
    • Section 2 (Discipline) – amendment of pages 55, 56, 57 and 58.
       
  • Annex A1 (Periodic review of the financial and social conditions of members of the personnel) – amendment of page 62.
  • Annex RA1 (General definition of career paths) – page 66 is deleted.
  • Annex RA2 (Financial awards) - amendment of page 67.
  • Annex RA5 (Monthly basic salaries of staff members) - amendment of page 71.
  • Annex RA8 (International indemnity) – amendment of page 74.
  • Annex RA9 (Installation indemnity) – amendment of page 75.
  • Annex RA10 (Reinstallation indemnity) – amendment of page 76.



The complete updated electronic version of the Staff Rules and Regulation will be accessible via CDS on 1 September 2016.

Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 4) – Special working hours

Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 4) entitled "Special working hours", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1 September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208539.

 

This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 23 (Rev. 3) also entitled "Special working hours" of January 2013.

This document contains modifications to reflect the new career structure and ensuring the provision consistent with practice that compensation or remuneration of special working hours performed remotely is possible only in case of emergency.  

This circular will enter into force on 1 September 2016.

Administrative Circular No. 13 (Rev. 4) – Guarantees for representatives of the personnel

Administrative Circular No. 13 (Rev. 4) entitled "Guarantees for representatives of the personnel", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 22 March 2016, will be available on 1 September 2016 via the following link: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2208527.

 

This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 13 (Rev. 3) also entitled "Guarantees for representatives of the personnel" of January 2014.

This document contains a single change to reflect the terminology under the new career structure: the term "career path" is replaced by "grade".

This circular will enter into force on 1 September 2016.

LHC Report: a break from luminosity production

The LHC has been in great shape over the last few months, delivering over 20 fb-1 of integrated luminosity before the ICHEP conference in Chicago at the beginning of August. This is not much below the 25 fb-1 target for the whole of 2016. With this success in mind, a break in luminosity production was taken for six days, starting on 26 July 2016, for a machine development period.

 

This year, 20 days of the LHC schedule are devoted to machine development with the aim of carrying out detailed studies of the accelerator. The 20 days are divided over five different periods, called MD blocks. They can be seen as an investment in the future, so the machine can produce collisions more efficiently in the months and years to come. A detailed programme is worked out for each MD block, whereby different specialist teams are assigned periods of four to twelve hours, depending on the topic, to perform their previously approved tests. The MD program continues 24 hours per day, as in normal physics operation.

One way of increasing the collision rate is to change the size of the beam at the interaction points in the centre of the experiments by changing the quadrupole settings on either side of a given experiment. During the first MD block, a novel way of doing this, known as ATS optics, was explored. This approach means that ever smaller beam sizes can be obtained in the future. The more the size of the proton bunches that make up the beam is reduced, the higher the chance of collisions.

Another area being studied is beam instability, a familiar operational problem. When beam intensity is increased, or a change is made to the way the accelerator is filled, the operations team has to adjust different machine parameters to prevent the beams becoming unstable. When instabilities arise, they can cause beam loss, which is automatically detected and can cause a beam dump to avoid any damage to the LHC. The relationship between the angle at which the beams collide in the centre of the experiments and beam stability is also being studied. The smaller the crossing angle, the better the chances for collisions and so higher instantaneous luminosities.

Another aspect of the current tests concerns the optimisation of the process for injecting proton bunches. This concerns both the beam instabilities at injection and the blow-up of the beam during the injection process.

After six days of study, the LHC resumed normal operation on 1 August 2016. Following the end of the MD period, the LHC resumed normal luminosity production. The last couple of weeks have, however, been interrupted by some technical problems in both the LHC and the injectors. Of note in the LHC are issues with the injection kickers and a potential inter-turn short in one of the main bending magnets. Nonetheless, good performance is being delivered, with the total number of bunches per beam now at 2220 – a high for the year.

From Monday, 22 August another four days of machine development are on the programme, to study the longitudinal behaviour of the beam, gain a deeper insight into beam stability and explore different means of increasing the luminosity.

ICHEP 2016: to b(ump) or not to b(ump)

This week I’m in Chicago for the 38th International Conference on High Energy Physics, ICHEP 2016, hosted this year by the US particle physics community. While it became clear at the conference that the famous 750 GeV bump has flatlined, there’s been a wealth of physics from CERN and around the world.

 

Everyone in their heart felt that the bump would turn out to be no more than a statistical fluctuation, while secretly hoping that it would be something new. Even the designer of the ICHEP 2016 logo cleverly hid a bump with a subtle question mark in the Chicago skyline – appropriately enough in Anish Kapoor’s mysterious ‘Cloud Gate’ sculpture.

That question mark has now been resolved. Kapoor’s sculpture returns to being just that, and the search for new physics goes on albeit further constrained as theorists revealed in the 400+ papers in the wake of the bump discussion. The highlight from CERN was undoubtedly the spectacular performance of the LHC, which has already delivered five times more data in 2016 than it did in all of 2015. This has, by necessity, been accompanied by equally spectacular performance by the experiments and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, WLCG, which is smashing all its previous records and straining the resources. The four major LHC experiments presented new results ranging from new Higgs measurements to extremely rare decay processes and new measurements on Quark Gluon Plasma. Some highlights from CERN included the exploration of the di-lepton and di-boson spectra at high masses, CP-violation in baryonic B-decays and common understanding between experiments of the suppression of charm production and the emergence of jets from the quark-gluon plasma. In the city of Chicago the ambitious plans for neutrino physics figured highly; the planning of long-baseline experiments is making good progress in the US and Japan. Gravitational waves still topped the list of most talked about physics following LIGO’s discoveries announced earlier this year. The latter also was the topic of a much-acclaimed public lecture.

ICHEP is the most important gathering this year for our field, and it was good to see so many colleagues from all around the world in Chicago. The organisers made a particular effort in engaging young people in the scientific presentations. Every day saw some fifteen young scientists present their own results in exactly one minute on a single viewgraph. They succeeded impressively, setting high standards in conciseness and quality of lively presentation.

Eckhard Elsen, Director for Research and Computing​​​